5 Fantastic Ginger Benefits + 5 Ginger Tea Recipes

5 Fantastic Ginger Benefits plus 5 Ginger Tea Recipes

In the superfoods hall of fame, ginger root — a dual herb-spice with potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant powers — holds a special place. Here are 5 benefits of ginger plus a bonus list of ginger tea recipes.

High in Vitamin C, magnesium, amino acids and trace elements such as calcium, zinc and phosphorus, ginger has long been considered a health-boosting superfood.

For more than 5,000 years ancient traditions, including traditional Chinese medicine and the Ayurvedic tradition in India, relied on the root of the Zingiber officinale plant.

In Ayurvedic tradition, it is regarded as a universal medicine while Chinese tradition praises ginger’s ability to restore the Yang energy (i.e. your positive, dominant and upward-seeking aspects).

Priced as a luxury commodity at the time, its invigorating, soothing and healing properties became so coveted that soon spice traders demanded a living sheep in return for ginger.

To this day, India and China with their warm and damp climates grow most of the ginger production worldwide.

While prices for ginger have adjusted and become more attainable over time, the appreciation for this superfood has gone through the roof in recent years.

5 Fantastic Ginger Benefits plus 5 Ginger Tea Recipes

What exactly are the acclaimed ginger benefits 

1. Ginger Supports Digestive Health and Fights Motion Sickness and Nausea 

In millions of households around the globe, ginger root and the tea made from it have been relied on to improve the triple gastrointestinal function of food digestion, food absorption and food elimination.

To stimulate these functions, it is recommended that slow digesters drink 2-3 cups of ginger tea a day, preferably in the morning and before meals.

Sea, air and road travelers may also be familiar with ginger as a remedy that tempers nausea, motion sickness and vomiting.

Whether in the form of a cup of ginger tea or chewing on a 1/2 inch slice of freshly peeled raw ginger, either of these helps prevent and relieve symptoms once they arise.

A 2012 study at the University of Rochester Medical Center confirms that cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy had significantly less severe nausea attacks after consuming ginger.

2. Ginger Relieves Menstrual Pains

Female tea enthusiasts may appreciate ginger tea for relieving monthly menstruation pains.

To maximize the effect, experts recommend sipping a cup of freshly brewed ginger tea with a little bit of honey while applying a towel soaked in warm ginger tea to the lower abdomen.

This may sound adventurous, but may very well be worth a try since recent scientific studies found that ginger was as effective in reducing period pains as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen.

3. Ginger Reduces Inflammation

Many modern day diseases, from arthritis, cancer and diabetes to Alzheimer's and heart disease, are rooted in inflammatory conditions or chronic inflammations.

Ginger root's gingerol content has proven to effectively address inflammation which is why we feature it as a top ingredient in our superfoods directory.

Another randomized, double-blind study published in the Arthritis and Rheumatism journal found that among 261 osteoarthritis patients with knee issues, ginger helped relieve knee pain when administered over an extended time period.

4. Ginger Helps with Weight Loss

A systematic meta-analysis of 14 studies suggests that ginger may support weight loss by reducing appetite, blocking fat absorption and accelerating the fat breakdown.

This directly contributes to a reduction in both body weight and belly fat (waist-to-hip ratio).

Gingerol, one of ginger's core compounds, has been shown to stimulate certain biological activities including the accelerated processing, digesting and transporting of foods in the digestive tract ­which has an anti-obesity effect.

5. Ginger Boosts the Immune System

Ginger root is filled with antioxidants: gingerols, shogaols and paradols, to name a few. All of these powerful -ols help bind and destroy free radicals which are responsible for causing severe cell damage and cell mutations, including cancer.  

But even less dramatic assaults on your immune system, including a common cold or a sore throat, can be more successfully warded off if supported by the spicy and invigorating warmth of a good ginger tea.

A study confirming this found that fresh ginger helped the fight against viral respiratory infections, blocking the formation of virus-induced plaques in the respiratory tract.

In addition to these antiviral properties, a further test tube study suggests that fresh ginger featured antibacterial properties that could affect the prevention of gum infections and periodontal diseases, too.

In sum, while the health effects and benefits of ginger continue to be the subject of scientific studies, ginger's positive impact on immunity, including respiratory, gum and mouth health seems hardly a secret anymore.

5 Fantastic Ginger Benefits plus 5 Ginger Tea Recipes

Ginger Precautions and Recommendations

Despite the beneficial effects of ginger root and ginger tea, ginger certainly should not be viewed as a substitute for standard care in treating particular health conditions.

By now we are probably sounding like a broken record, but no superfood, not even ginger, is a magic bullet for all ailments.

Experts also advise that you limit the daily consumption of ginger to 4 grams a day, and to stop consuming it in case of side effects, including stomach sensitivity, diarrhea or heartburn.

How to Make Ginger Tea?

Now that we’ve got the disclaimer out of the way, you can freely enjoy ginger within moderation and here is all you need to know about how to make the perfect cup of ginger tea.

It’s not terribly complicated: all a fresh ginger root tea takes is fresh ginger and filtered hot water. Anything else is optional.

Take fresh, organic ginger root and rinse it, if needed (we prefer to give it a quick clean, so we don’t have to peel off the skin).  

Next, chop of a 2-inch (or 1/2 ounce) piece of whole ginger and slice it into thin pieces (some ginger aficionados even prefer to grate it), so that the ginger can release a maximal amount of its intense flavors and aroma.

Now, add these thin slices into a pot filled with 32 ounces (or 1 liter) of fresh, purified water. Bring to boil, then reduce the heat and let the ginger simmer for 10-15 minutes to bring out the full flavor.

Strain your tea and enjoy!

Ginger Tea Recipes

If you want to introduce a little bit of variety into your newly-found love for everything ginger, we’ve pulled together a few variations below.

1. Ginger Lemon Vitamin C Power Drink (3-4 servings)

Follow recipe as above, adding the freshly squeezed juice of one whole lemon or lime to your teapot.

2. Ginger Mint Freshness (3-4 servings)

Follow recipe as above, with one variation: add fresh mint leaves to your teapot and allow to steep for 5 minutes.

3. Ginger Echinacea Immunity Booster (3-4 servings)

Follow recipe as above, adding 1 cup of loose leaf dried echinacea (or 2 cups of fresh, homegrown echinacea) to the water and let steep together with the ginger for 15 minutes.

4. Ginger Green Tea Antioxidant Blast (3-4 servings)

Follow recipe as above, preparing the ginger tea first. Once ready, add 4 tablespoons of green tea leaves to your hot tea, letting it steep for 1-2 minutes.

5. Ginger Turmeric Tea (3-4 servings)

  • 2-inches of ginger root

  • 4 cups boiling water

  • 1/4 tablespoon ground turmeric

  • 1/4 tablespoon cayenne pepper

  • 1/2 teaspoon bee pollen (or alternatively raw honey)

We recommend getting your Turmeric powder from a trusted source such as Ora Organic. You can read our review about Ora Organic and get an exclusive 10% discount when using our link plus the code SUPERDRINKS10 at checkout.

Yes, we may get a commission to support the superdrinks website, but only promote products we've thoroughly researched and tested.

6. Ginger Superflush & Detox Drink (3-4 servings, drink hot)

  • 4 cups filtered water

  • 2 squeezed lemons

  • 2 inches ginger

  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric

  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

  • 1 tablespoon raw honey